News and notes from the Communication program @ Fairfield

Archive for February, 2012

Prof. Zhang on “Tiger Moms”

It was standing room only in CNS15 when Associate Professor Qin Zhang led a panel of faculty discussing Amy Chua’s controversial Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother and the stereotype of “extreme” parenting in Chinese families.  In pursuit of academic excellence for her children, Chua advocates unceasing – even severe – discipline, work ethic, and high standards.

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Embrace Your Colleagues

Occasionally in this space, we’ll pass along great reads we come across in the popular press that relate to our teaching and research.  This past weekend, The New York Times had a helpful interview from the world of organizational communication – and a lesson that all of us in (or entering) the working world might find of use…

“Take out your business card and look at it. That business card will have more value if any one of you succeeds here, even if you’re not remotely a part of that success. You are not competing with each other in here.  If you think you win when your idea wins out over your neighbor’s, that’s a pretty small gain. In fact, I would suggest that you help your neighbor’s ideas get better.

I would suggest that if you look at something and you have a better idea, that you generously give that idea to someone and make them better. Because if we all do that, we all win. The minute you’re the only good thing at this company, we’re done.  So can you do it?  Can you be that generous?” – Susan Credle, CCO of Leo Burnett USA

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From Russia With Media

What is the experience of media consumption in everyday Russian life?  On Wednesday, February 29th, at noon, Inna Pronicheva will give her audience a glimpse of Russian audiences: What role does television play in family life?  How does content differ from our American expectations?  What values are embedded in Russian media?  How do Russians use TV and the internet to gratify their needs and what limitations remain in terms of access and opportunity?  And how is the next generation of Russian youth adapting to the new media environment?

At an important moment in the history and politics of Russia – not to mention amidst ongoing issues of free speech – Pronicheva’s insight arrives at an opportune time.  She is currently a Fulbright Russian Language Teaching Assistant at Fairfield and will be sharing her expertise with students and faculty through “The Russian Hours,” a series dedicated to various aspects of Russian culture.  The presentations are made with the support of the Department of Foreign Language and Literatures, the Russian and East European Studies Program, and Professor Elena Syssoeva.  Don’t miss this intriguing talk!

Wednesday, February 29th @ 12nooon: Bannow 137

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In the beginning…

We’ll admit that we’re a little partial to words around here: Communication is, after all, at the heart of what we do as human beings.  It defines and maintains our realities, identities, relationships, communities, and cultures.  In our teaching and research, we construct, measure, critique, and analyze communication in all its glorious (and, all too often, not-so-glorious) forms.  Whether it be spoken, written, or broadcast, we’ve got a collective mind for messages and the gift of gab to go along with it.  So you can see why a blog might be an enticing outlet for departmental goings-on.

Thus, we give you: CommBlog, a running record of notable news in and around Fairfield University’s Department of Communication.  Whether it be research publications and conference presentations from our dynamic faculty or student accomplishments in and opportunities for our undergraduate and master’s programs, count on this to be your one-stop shop for all things Fairfield Communication.  If there are events or stories you’d like to see highlighted or linked, don’t hesitate to pass along your tips to: mserazio at fairfield.edu.

We’ll do our darnedest to run all the news that’s fit to print.  Welcome to CommBlog!

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