Dr. Ingeborg Haug

Submitted by Web Communications on November 15, 2011

 

I have dedicated close to 18 years to the clinical training of our students and been instrumental in the growth of our program and our on-campus clinic, and my commitment does not end with my retirement.

Dr. Ingeborg Haug

Associate Professor of Marriage & Family Therapy
(retired)

Teaching at Fairfield

For 15 years after joining the faculty of the Graduate School of Education and Allied Professions (GSEAP), I was part of a two-faculty department. It really was a wonderful opportunity to collaborate with my colleague, Dr. Rona Preli, to shape the program and to contribute to the excellence of our curriculum and professional training.

My teaching and scholarship have mainly focused on professional ethics and clinical training, though I’ve taught a wide variety of courses including human sexuality, couple therapy, and family therapy interventions. For the past three years I initiated and led the first GSEAP international study tour to London. Fostering international outreach and professional “cross-fertilization” have been my professional focus for over 20 years. It has been a privilege and a delight to teach our graduate students who are dedicated, interested and interesting, bright, and come from a variety of backgrounds. Their enthusiasm and critical thinking truly enriches every class.

Marriage and Family Therapy Program

I am the retired clinical director and associate professor of Marriage and Family Therapy. I have dedicated close to 18 years to the clinical training of our students and been instrumental in the growth of our program and our on-campus clinic, and my commitment does not end with my retirement. I am delighted to support the University and in particular the growth of the Koslow Center in any way I can, so that it can flourish as a state-of-the-art training facility for our marriage and family therapy and counseling students, a place for the community to receive quality mental health care and support, and a center for faculty and students’ cutting-edge research in clinical treatment issues.

Faculty and Professional Learning Community

When I was asked to join the Faculty and Professional Learning Community (FPLC) on spirituality, I welcomed getting back to the topic that for most of my life had been a personal and later also a professional and research focus for me. In addition to my academic career, I am also a clergy woman, ordained 40 years ago, and it had been 10 years since I had published my last paper on spirituality.

The most profound impact of our FPLC for me was on my sense of connectedness—primarily and most obviously connectedness with my small community of colleagues, but also with the University, my students, my teaching, and my research. This is not surprising to me, since in the field of neuroscience and its application to psychotherapy/family therapy there is increasing research support for the profound impact that “attachment,” or caring connectedness, has on a person’s mental, intellectual, emotional, and physical well-being throughout the lifespan (Siegel, 2001). The experience of our FPLC’s collaboration and caring community was transformative for me—in a subtle way—and gave me a renewed sense of connectedness to my five wonderful colleagues and also to the wider University community.

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