John Sacco ’51

Submitted by Web Communications on November 15, 2011

 

For me, the most important educational experience at Fairfield was the broad classical education in the humanities with enough science… to get into medical school, yet maintaining an appreciation of literature, language, philosophy, and theology.

John Sacco ’51

Retired physician
60th Reunion Committee member

Major: Biology

A favorite Fairfield memory

How can I pick any one memory at Fairfield University? There are too many! But I sure enjoyed the Glee Club, the concerts (particularly the unofficial ones after the concert. Did we ever pay for beer? I’m sure we were responsible for all the gray (and loss) of Father Murray and Mr. Harak’s hair!) But, seriously, the camaraderie, the academic climate promoted by faculty but made easier by the maturity of older veterans returning to college from the war, and the closeness of the faculty who were always available and willing to help kept us all close. I never felt lost at Fairfield, from the very first day when Ciro and his Bridgeport boys took me in.

Life in the past 60 years since you graduated

I returned to Norwalk, Conn., to set up practice after my residency training in internal medicine, which was after spending three years in the army medical corps in Germany as a captain. My medical career was very rewarding. I started a private practice in 1962, and in 1964 joined with six other internists to form the Norwalk Medical Group, of which I was the president until my retirement in 1994. We had grown to 22 physicians, embracing all the sub-specialties of Internal Medicine.

In 1972, I was appointed chief of the section of Primary Care Internal Medicine at Norwalk Hospital and was responsible for the Residency Training Program affiliated with Yale Medical School. I had a clinical appointment as assistant and then associate professor until my retirement in 1997.

I’ve been married for 55 years to my wonderful wife, Donna LoRusso Sacco from Waterbury, whom I met at St. Francis Hospital in Hartford during my residency. We have one daughter and four sons, and are blessed with four granddaughters and two grandsons.

Fairfield’s impact

For me, the most important educational experience at Fairfield was the broad classical education in the humanities with enough science under Frs. Wilkie and Hutchinson to get into medical school, yet maintaining an appreciation of literature, language, philosophy, and theology. It stood me in good stead in my profession—to remember that it isn’t an illness a person has, but rather a person who has an illness.

Now, in my retirement journey, I have reopened the books of philosophy and theology once again, and have found a whole new world. I must confess that Karl Rahner has replaced Thomas Aquinas—but that’s another story for another time.

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