College of Arts and Sciences celebrates faculty publications

Submitted by Carolyn Arnold, Assistant Director, Marketing & Communications on December 5, 2012

The University’s new bookstore in downtown Fairfield, Conn., was the location for a special series of events showcasing College of Arts and Sciences faculty’s latest publications. The events, which took place in the Spring semester of 2012, treated the community to stimulating topics including government sanctions, realist artists, and Jewish architecture.

The series began in March with Dr. Joy Gordon, professor of philosophy, talking about the Sanctions in Iraq that she detailed in her first book, Invisible War: The United States and the Iraq Sanctions. Since the book came out in 2010, she’s continued educating the public on the topic and has published new articles on the topic and has been invited to speak about sanctions at the American Academic Institute for Research in Iraw, held in Jordan, and at Columbia University, Harvard, and the University of Chicago.

Also in March Dr. Philip Eliasoph, professor of art history in the Visual and Performing Arts Department, presented his new book, Colleen Browning: The Enchantment of Realism. Browning (1918-2003) was one of the only women realist painters to achieve recognition for her work. Her body of work won her critical acclaim, including the Carnegie International Award. Despite her obvious talent and impressive body of work, Browning has been almost forgotten in contemporary times. That’s where Dr. Eliasoph comes in: He has long championed the art of the Magic Realists in his research.

“I guess this latest monographic book project is best explained as yet another one of the hidden gems – American artists who were once critically acclaimed – who ended up falling by the wayside,” Dr. Eliasoph noted. “Inspired by so many of these superbly talented, multi-talented mid-century painters, my professional task has been to restore these artists – Paul Cadmus, Robert Vickrey, and now Colleen Browning – to their original positions as creative dynamos.” Fairfield will celebrate Browning’s contributions to art in two exhibitions running from January 24 through Sunday, March 24. “Colleen Browning: The Early Works” will be on view at the Bellarmine Museum of Art and “Colleen Browning: A Brush with Magic” will be exhibited at the Thomas J. Walsh Art Gallery on campus. For more information, visit www.fairfield.edu/arts.

Dr. Gavriel Rosenfeld, associate professor of history, spoke about Jewish Architecture, the topic of his latest book, Building After Aushwitz: Jewish Architecture and the Memory of the Holocaust. The book details Dr. Rosenfeld’s in-depth interviews with leading architects and archival research to explain the origins of “new Jewish architecture,” an interesting topic of discussion, he noted during the lecture, because, “Some people think Jewish Architecture doesn’t exist.” By discussing architectural movements such as modernists, postmodernists, and deconstructivists, Dr. Rosenfeld presented the contributions of Jewish architects and suggested the ways in which Jewish themes, ideas, and imagery directly influenced their creations.

The series concluded in May when Dr. Kurt Schlichting, the E. Gerald Corrigan Chair and Professor of Sociology and Anthropology talked about Grand Central’s Engineer: William J. Wilgus and the Planning of Modern Manhattan. Dr. Schlicting has spent many years studying Grand Central Station, transportation in New York City, and William Wilgus, the chief engineer of the New York Central Railroad. The book examines how Wilgus had a lasting affect on how people and goods moved over and under Manhattan.

The Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and the Learning for a Lifetime Program co-sponsored the series. More events celebrating faculty’s latest publications will be held in the bookstore each semester. Visit www.fairfield.edu/arts for more information.

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