Alumni Profile: Mark Maestranzi

Submitted by Web Communications on September 8, 2006

If you’re trying to make sure that everyone has access to the world’s resources, then you’re practicing sound economics – and promoting social justice.

Mark Maestranzi ’03

Program: Economics – B.S.

Hometown: New York, NY

why he doesn’t have a job title

No one has official titles at Bloomberg. Everyone – 8,000 employees around the world – is on a first-name basis. The CEO sits out on the floor. If you want to talk to him, you go and tap him on the shoulder.

why that makes sense

Our main product is software that has financial data and analytic tools. To stay on the cutting edge, you have to have the most innovative analytics – so if someone has a good idea, they want to hear it.

why sales isn’t simple

I’m working with a big, complex piece of software. And if my clients use it, it’ll change the way they do business – and that’ll change the market.

why the beginning is not the end

I started at Bloomberg as an interpreter – I’d learned Portuguese on a Fairfield program in Brazil. As you learn more, as your interests develop, you take different positions. I went to the analytics desk and then to the sales desk, visiting clients and teaching them to use our tools. You want a college that prepares you to make those kinds of moves.

what it means to study economics at a jesuit university

You see your work in a broader context. Economics is the efficient allocation of scarce resources. If you’re trying to make sure that everyone has access to the world’s resources, then you’re practicing sound economics – and promoting social justice.

Tiny URL for this post: http://tinyurl.com/7kf7dkm