News and notes from the WGS program @ Fairfield

The Minor

Standing Room Only at “In the Works” WGSS Panel

It was standing room only as Dr. Alphonso, Dr. Arendt, Dr. Lawrence and Dr. Orlando talked about their current academic projects at last week’s “In the Works” Panel discussion, part of Women’s History Month here at Fairfield University.  Attendees listened to the professors, from a range of disciplines, discuss topics ranging from Edith Wharton to roller derby.  in the works

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In the Works: WGS Faculty Talk about Current Projects – April 4, 6:00PM

lectureJoin WGSS for a faculty panel discussion about current research projects:

Professor Alphonso – “Family, Politics and the State”

Professor Arendt – “A Rink of One’s Own: Gender, Sport and the Alter Ego in Contemporary Roller Derby”

Professor Lawrence: “Jarena Lee’s Calling: Biography and Storytelling”

Professor Orlando: “Edith Wharton, Women and the Politics of Representation”

All are welcome!  Refreshments will be served.  BCC 206

 

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Women’s Day, April 4 2013 at Fairfield University!

Women’s Day, April 4,  BCC Lower Level – 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m
Come discover and celebrate women, past and present, who have found their identity through imagination and innovation! Enjoy table presentations from several Fairfield University clubs, arts and crafts, baked goods, a Bead-for-Life jewelry sale, performances throughout the day, and much more!

At 6:00pm, in BCC 206, be sure to check out “In the Works,” WGS Faculty Talk about their Current Projects. In honor of Women’s History Month, WGS faculty will share their current research pertaining to women, gender and sexuality. WOMEN_2013

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Call for Submissions: Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies Award 2013

lecture

All WGSS Minors are invited to submit a research paper for the Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies Award.  This award is coordinated by the Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies Program to recognize outstanding work.  Please follow the steps outlined below.

Submit a Research Paper at least 2000 words in length on a topic in any of the following areas: women’s studies, feminist theory, gender studies, queer theory.  

Add a cover sheet that should include the following information:

        –name

        –year of expected graduation

       –essay title

       –campus or off-campus telephone number

      –campus box number

      –email address

     –the course for which the paper was written, the semester the course was taken, and the     name of the professor.

 Please prepare the paper as follows:

       — Put the title of your paper at the top of the first page

       –put the title and page number on all subsequent pages

        –type and double-space the paper

       –do NOT put your name on any page except the cover sheet.

 Submit two (2) copies of your paper (with the cover sheets attached) to Dr. Colleen Arendt’s mailbox, DMH 232.

 DEADLINE:   4:00 pm Tuesday, April 2, 2013

Contact Dr. David Gudelunas, Director of WGSS, with questions.

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“In the Works” WGS Faculty Talk about Current Projects – April 4

In honor of Women’s History Month, WGS faculty will share their current research pertaining to women, gender and sexuality.   Refreshments will be provided!  Join us on April 4, BCC 206 at 6:00 p.m. The following professors will be sharing on their latest research:

Gwendoline Alphonso: “Family, Politics and the State”

Colleen Arendt: “A Rink of One’s Own: Gender, Sport and the Alter Ego in Contemporary Roller Derby”

Anna Lawrence: “Jarena Lee’s Calling: Biography and Storytelling”

Emily Orlando: “Edith Wharton, Women and the Politics of Representation”

WOMEN_2013

 

 

Sponsored by the Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies Program.

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Havana Today: Continuity and Change

Five Fairfield Upr_havana_cars13niversity professors who visited Havana in January will give their multidisciplinary impressions of contemporary Cuba in “Havana Today: Between Continuity and Change” on Thursday, March 21, 2013, at 6 p.m. The discussion, which is free and open to the public, will take place in the University’s DiMenna-Nyselius Library multimedia room.

Faculty participating in the talk will be: Joy Gordon, Ph.D., professor of politics; Gisela Gil-Egui, Ph.D., assistant professor of communication; Olivia Harriott, Ph.D., associate professor of biology; Ania Aksan, Ph.D., assistant professor of economics; and Giovanni Ruffini, Ph.D., associate professor of history.

Light refreshments will be provided.

The event is part of the University’s two-year focus on Cities. It is sponsored by the Humanities Institute of the College of Arts & Sciences; the Latin American & Caribbean Studies Program; the Public Lectures & Events Committee; the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program; and the departments of Philosophy, Communication, Biology, Economics, and History.

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Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies Alumnae Panel Tonight

Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies Alumnae Panel

Kelley Center Presentation Room – Tonight!womens-history-month

 

Tonight we kick off Women’s History Month with the Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies Program Alumnae Career Panel Discussion!

Hear about life after Fairfield as some of our recent graduates share their experiences in the working world. The discussion will be moderated by Professor Orlando.  Refreshments will be provided.

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White Rainbow Documentary Screening and Panel Discussion Tomorrow!

MohiniGiriJoin us for the Screening of White Rainbow
Thursday, March 7th at 6pm, BCC Lower Level

The holy city of Vrindavan India, also known as the “City of Widows” harbors nearly 20,000 widows who are abandoned on the streets and flock there in the hopes of finding “Moksha” – Salvation. In Indian society, widows are stigmatized and maligned.  Learn about a little known yet urgent subject and help bring social justice for women and societies worldwide!

For more information on the film, visit http://asiasociety.org/policy/social-issues/human-rights/mohini-giri-indias-voice-voiceless 

Brought to us by the Montage Initiative; Center for Faith and Public Life; International Studies; Peace and Justice Studies; Sociology and Anthropology; Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies; Model United Nations Club

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Use what you have learned through WGSS, enter the ePortfolio “Share your Path” Contest & Win $500!

coreThe six Core Pathways represent different ways in which you can give shape and trajectory to your experiences at Fairfield, both in and out of the classroom. Through reflecting on the Pathways in a way that incorporates your own interests, passions and academic goals, you will be working to discover your way and deepen your experience through your four years at Fairfield University.

In your E-portfolio entry, present through words, pictures, videos, assignments or projects — or other artifacts and mementos from your year thus far — how the variety of experiences you’ve had both in and out of the classroom have helped you to understand that one of the six Pathways may represent a fruitful, rewarding thematic guide for appreciating your progress so far at Fairfield, and for planning your next couple of years here.

The “Global Citizenship” core is about recognizing and respecting the identities and dignities of all people as well as the planet we all live on. This is a perfect fit for WGSS!

Support WGSS and win $500!

fairfield.digication.com/contest/Home//

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Welcome back!

Expect a lot of great things coming from Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies this semester!  Check back often as we are planning our annual Women’s Month events as well as other events.  New courses are also in the works for the next academic year so it is an exciting time to be involved with WGSS!

Here’s an interesting link to get the semester started and to get us thinking about gender: Nepal to issue “third gender” citizenship. 2013-marketing-trends

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Wednesday at 7:30pm Dr. Gudelunas will speak about communication taboos as part of “Talk about communication: Twenty-five years of Communication at Fairfield University”

Join Dr. David Gudelunas, chair of WGSS, on Wednesday night at “Talk about communication: 25 years of communication at Fairfield University”  The event will take place at the Dolan School of Business Dining Room at 7:30PM.

Dr. Gudelunas will discuss communication taboos, specifically the intersection of media, culture and sex.

Dr. Sallyanne Ryan will reflect on 25 years of communication at Fairfield.

Dr. Qin Zang will discuss psychological reactance and verbal defensiveness in the workplace: “the effects of perceived threat and interactional justice in supervisor requests.”

Dr. Michael Pagano will discuss a collaborative approach: “getting interpersonal with simulation pedagogy.”

This lecture is funded by a grant from the Humanities Institute of the College of Arts & Sciences Part 2 in the series in Spring 2013.

Come out and support WGSS!

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WGSS Will be at the Majors/Minors Fair Today!

Come meet the faculty of WGSS, have your questions answered and learn about our upcoming courses at the Majors/Minors Fair in BCC Oak Room from 11am to 3pm.  We hope to see you there!!

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Boston Globe reports “LGBT workplace policies a draw for MBA students”

 

This week, some of America’s biggest and best known corporations, including Walt Disney Co., J.P. Morgan Chase & Co., and consumer products giant Unilever, will descend on Boston to recruit students from the nation’s top business schools.

The companies will promote industry trends and career opportunities. And they will also highlight policies that make their workplaces friendly, comfortable, and inclusive for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender employees.

On Thursday, more than 1,000 MBA candidates, corporate executives, and recruiters will gather at the Seaport ­Hotel and World Trade Center for the annual Reaching Out LGBT MBA Conference, which aims to connect lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender, or ­LGBT, business school students with some of the nation’s leading companies. Now in its 14th year, the conference has grown from 150 students networking over boxed lunches at Harvard Business School to a three-day event with high-profile sponsors, a sign that corporate America is more progressive than the public sector when it comes to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights.

The first major public company to offer health benefits to gay and lesbian couples, in 1991, was Lotus Development Corp., a Cambridge software company — more than a decade before Massachusetts became the first state to legalize same-sex marriage. Nearly all of the 636 major companies surveyed this year by the Human Rights Campaign — 99 percent — prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation; 80 percent forbid discrimination based on gender identity. Yet there are no federal laws, and only a handful of state laws, that do the same.

“There’s really no question that corporate America is leading the charge in the area of workplace fairness,” said Paul Guequierre, spokesman for the Human Rights Campaign, an LGBT civil rights organization in Washington. “In 29 states you can be fired from a job for being gay, and in 34 states for being transgender. That sad fact makes corporate nondiscrimination policies vital for LGBT workers.”

Executives say their companies haven’t put these policies in place for altruistic reasons. They are hungry for talent and want to attract the best and the brightest. In addition, labor specialists say, a diverse workforce contributes to a company’s profitability. A variety of experiences and opinions leads to a more well-rounded, creative process, and can appeal to a wider array of consumers.

Like many people in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community, Hannah Yankelevich, who will graduate with an MBA from Dartmouth College next year, said she’ll consider how companies treat LGBT workers when she weighs offers. She’s thinking about returning to General Mills in Minneapolis, where she interned over the summer, because the chief executive announced that the company opposed an amendment recognizing marriage only as the union between a man and a woman.

“I wouldn’t work for a company that didn’t offer a supportive environment for the LGBT community, ” said Yankelevich, 27, one of the organizers of the conference.

State Street Corp. is attending the Reaching Out conference for the first time this year as it seeks to further expand its recruiting into minority and underrepresented communities. The Boston financial services giant attends conferences held by the National Black MBA Association and the Association of Latino Professionals in Finance and Accounting for the same reason.

“Were not going to advance State Street unless we have access to the best talent, and that’s by offering an environment where employees can bring their whole selves to the workplace,” said Mike Scannell, head of talent acquisition and global inclusion. “For us to not be open to individuals regardless of their background is really prohibiting us from getting access to the best resources and talent that are out there.”

Along with policies prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity, State Street has an employee group for LGBT workers and offers domestic partner health insurance, including transgender benefits for prescriptions and laboratory tests. The company is considering covering sex change surgery.

Mike Harrington, vice president and senior counsel at State Street, said he probably wouldn’t have come to State Street from a Boston law firm in 1998 if the company wasn’t welcoming to gay employees. In fact, Harrington told a headhunter that he wouldn’t apply for an opening at one New England company because it didn’t offer health insurance for same-sex partners. But it’s more than the benefits that have kept him at State Street. He feels comfortable plastering his office with pictures of his two sons and partner of 12 years.

“My family is the same as everyone else’s,” he said. “For me, it’s more about being in a place where I talk about Dave in the same way that the woman who sits next to me talks about her husband.”

Antonio Gomez-Lopez, a second-year student at the MIT Sloan School of Management, feels the same way. Gomez-Lopez, who helped organize the Reaching Out conference, said a company’s LGBT policies play a crucial role in deciding where he will work.

“I don’t want to hold a double life,” he said.

http://bostonglobe.com/business/2012/10/17/lgbt-workplace-policies-draw-for-mba-students/vJIUkPBP8SQCp6S1VxtiuI/story.html
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Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies Faculty Open House is Tonight!

This evening, we are very excited to host our annual New Faculty Open House!  This has always been a  great opportunity to meet our new faculty in an informal environment and a time to catch up with friends.  Come join the faculty of the Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies program as we welcome new faculty to the Fairfield community.    5:00pm in DHM  115.

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Meet Eve: The Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies Graduate Assistant

Eve Liptak

Name: Eve Liptak

Q. What are you studying at Fairfield?

A.  I am completing my final semester in the Communication MA program. Something that attracted me to this program was how versatile the course options are so that I could approach the subject from a variety of  angles.

Q. What was your undergraduate experience?

A.  I attended SUNY Purchase College for my undergraduate degree. A liberal arts school located outside of New York City, this location exposed me to both a diverse curriculum as well as student population. I started as a journalism major, but felt I wanted to learn more than just how to contribute to the media but also the “behind-the-scenes”. I received my B.A in Media Studies, a mix of hands-on media training, advertising, and sociology. Through this coursework we often touched upon the areas of women, gender, and sexuality. I would say two of my most influential courses were “Media Representations & Identity” and “Introduction to Women’s Studies”.

Q. Why did you want to work as a graduate assistant in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies?

A.  I wanted to work as a GA in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies because the areas have always been an interest of mine. When I was in high school I attended a class trip to see a one woman show of Eve Ensler’s “The Good Body”.  I recall how I’d never really considered these subjects before and how revealing that experience was.  I think it’s important that we explore the areas of women, gender, and sexuality because they are so influential and interdisciplinary.

These topics are not just areas that continuously reappear in my academic studies but are a part of our everyday lives. They are fields that are regularly influencing, changing, and expanding and I think the program name change reflects that.

I’m proud to see Fairfield University is part of the conversation on women, gender, and sexuality and to be able to contribute to this program as their graduate assistant.

Q. What is the best part of the job?

A. Sending out emails…Just kidding!

My favorite part of the job would have to be seeing all of the great work that not only the faculty and staff are completing, but also the students. I have been very impressed at what an active student community there is and the creativity and scope of these events and projects! I’m happy to be able to assist with these programs and also act as a resource to students interested in learning more about WGSS. Feel free to stop by DMH 115 to say hello!

Q. What do you do when not on campus?

A. I’m also very interested in the arts, so when I’m not on campus I’m often helping with a local gallery event. Aside from that I like to spend most of my time doing “normal” things like hanging out with friends, seeing live music or movies, visiting NYC, and walking around my neighborhood with my adorable Bichon “Orion”.
Q. What is something you would tell undergraduate students as they prepare to graduate?

A. Focus on what you’re most passionate about and it will make any task seem less like work.

And back-up all your important assignments! You don’t want to learn that lesson the hard way.

 

 

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Did you know how many courses can count toward your WGS minor?

Here is an updated list of all the courses from the various departments and professional schools that can count toward a minor in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies.  Remarkably, the minor is only 6 classes or 18 credits.  For more information stop by DMH 203 and see Dr. Gudelunas, the program director.

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Yeah, we have a new name

It may not be official until Fall 2012, but Women’s Studies will be known as Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies.  We’ve already started using the name in some places, like this nifty new flier that you’ll be seeing around campus.

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