News and notes from the WGS program @ Fairfield

Archive for March, 2014

Press on our upcoming event

Fairfield University celebrates 40 years of women undergraduates and 20 years of the Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies program on campus


“Nuns on the Bus” activist to be keynote speaker

Image: Campbell“Nuns on the Bus” organizer Sister Simone Campbell will be the keynote speaker for Fairfield University’s celebration of the 40th anniversary of undergraduate women graduating from Fairfield and the 20th anniversary of the Women’s Studies Program (now called Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies). The public is invited to her free lecture, “The View from the Bus: Opportunities for Making Mischief,” at 7 p.m., Thursday, April 3 at the Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts.  The lecture will be preceded by a gala reception at 6 p.m. in the Quick Center lobby.

“We are thrilled to have Sister Campbell on campus to mark this significant milestone in the history of the University and our interdisciplinary program,” said David Gudelunas, Ph.D., co-director of Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies (WGS). “Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies is one of the most dynamic programs on campus and we couldn’t think of a more dynamic speaker to help us celebrate with faculty, students, community members and hundreds of graduates of our program.”

Sister Campbell is an attorney, religious leader and renowned advocate for systematic change. She is the executive director of NETWORK, a Catholic leader in the global movement for justice and peace, which educates, lobbies and organizes for economic and social transformation. In Washington, Sister Campbell lobbies for issues of peace-building, immigration reform and healthcare and economic justice.

During the 2010 congressional debate about healthcare reform, Sister Campbell wrote the famous “nuns’ letter” supporting the reform bill and got 59 leaders of Catholic Sisters to sign, a sign seen by many as critical to the passage of the Affordable Care Act. In 2012, she was instrumental in organizing the “Nuns on the Bus” tour of nine states to oppose a budget she felt would decimate programs to help people in need. She recently completed another cross-country Nuns on the Bus tour in 2013 focused on immigration reform.

Sister Campbell has been a keynote or featured speaker in many national events, including the 2012 Democratic National Convention. She has appeared on “60 Minutes,” “The Colbert Report” and “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart,” among other media stints.

Sister Campbell is the former executive director of Jericho, a California interfaith public policy organization and she was the general director of her religious community, the Sisters of Social Service, leading sisters in the United States, Mexico, Taiwan and the Philippines.

Sister Campbell’s appearance is the centerpiece of the yearlong 40/20 celebration on campus. Though professional schools admitted women students before the 1970s, the first class of women undergraduates walked across the Bellarmine Hall terrace at Commencement in 1974.  Since then, female students have gone on to many leadership roles on campus and many successful careers after graduating from Fairfield.

“News of Sister Campbell’s visit has been met with great enthusiasm and meaningful support across the university,” said Emily Orlando, Ph.D., co-director of WGS. “ The WGS minor is flourishing and given Sister Campbell’s demonstrated commitment to social justice and her status as a strong female leader and advocate for change within the Catholic church, she struck us as an ideal choice for a celebration of the WGS program in particular and the achievements of Fairfield University women in general. We are so pleased that this event has been met with such widespread support from all corners of campus.”

WGS is an interdisciplinary program that challenges the cultural, intellectual, social and political assumptions about sex, gender and sexuality systems. Courses in the program critically engage issues of race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality and other key components of identity, and the ways they intersect. The program was first developed by a group of faculty who met over the two years from fall 1991 to spring 1993 to first envision and then write the proposal for the program. The program was formally approved and inaugurated in fall 1993.

For more information, visit www.fairfield.edu/4020 and follow the WGS program on Twitter @WGSFairfield.

Bookmark and Share

WGS is excited to welcome Sister Campbell to campus for a FREE lecture and reception at the Quick Center on April 3

WGS is excited to welcome Sister Campbell to campus for a FREE lecture and reception at the Quick Center on April 3 – mark your calendars!!

Check out Sister Campbell’s 2012  speech at the Democratic National Convention: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UgzQ5tjV_Fo

For more info, check out http://www.fairfield.edu/academics/schoolscollegescenters/collegeofartssciences/undergraduateprograms/womengendersexualitystudies/celebrate4020withwgs/

Bookmark and Share

March is Women’s History Month AND Irish American Heritage Month!

Here’s to Colonel Eileen Marie Collins who helps us celebrate Women’s History Month and St. Patrick’s Day!

On July 30th 1999, 30 years and two days after the first successful moonwalk, Irish American Colonel Eileen Marie Collins became the first woman to command a U.S. spacecraft. Eileen Collins was one of four children born to immigrant parents from County Cork in Elmira New York. Eileen expressed an early interest in flying, her parents often taking her to the local airport to watch aircraft take off and land. She worked to pay her tuition at the local community college where upon graduation she was awarded a scholarship to Syracuse University. At Syracuse, she earned degrees in Mathematics and Economics and joined the Air Force ROTC.

In the course of her 27 year Air Force/NASA career, Eileen Collins would attain the rank of Colonel and log 6,751 flight hours in 30 different types of aircraft and 872 hours in space. Collins was selected for the Astronaut program in 1990. She was the first woman to pilot a Shuttle in 1995 in the first joint American/Russian Mission to the Mir Space Station. She would pilot a subsequent mission to the Mir before her third shuttle flight where she was commander. In recognition of this special moment, Collins carried a scarf that had once belonged to aviation pioneer Amelia Earhart. In her fourth and final Shuttle Mission, Eileen Collins would be the first pilot to take the shuttle through a 360 degree pitch maneuver to ensure that the shuttle had not incurred damage during launch.

250px-Discoverycrew1

Bookmark and Share

Another event about women: Beyond Wool and Chastity: Roman Women in Public View

Today, Tuesday, March 11  5 pm at CNS 15

 

Professor Jacqueline Carlon (University of Massachusetts, Boston) will talk on “Beyond Wool and Chastity: Roman Women in Public View.”

 

Prof. Carlon will examine evidence of Roman women’s presence in public life, in contrast to the sheltered role Roman ideology assigned them.

Another great lecture on the topic of women during Women’s History Month!

Bookmark and Share

March is Women’s History Month – Celebrate Fairfield Firsts on Monday, March 10

Celebrate Women’s History Month by attending our panel on “Fairfield Firsts” on Monday, March 10 at 5:00pm at the Kelley Center Presentation Room

What was it like to be part of the first wave of women students at an all-male school? How were women treated when they joined the university as faculty members in the 1970s? How have things changed for women in leadership positions and in the other roles that were once reserved for men? Come join the discussion and add your questions, as we talk with “Fairfield Firsts” and celebrate Women’s History Month.

Light refreshments will be served.

Panelists include: Dr. Dorothea Braginsky, Dr. Phyllis Braun, Janet Canepa, Dr. Robbin Crabtree, Dr. Doris Lippman

Moderator: Dr. Anna Lawrence

Sponsored by the Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies Program

———————————————————-

A history of Women’s History Month:

Women’s History Month had its origins as a national celebration in 1981 when Congress passed Pub. L. 97-28 which authorized and requested the President to proclaim the week beginning March 7, 1982 as “Women’s History Week.”  Throughout the next five years, Congress continued to pass joint resolutions designating a week in March as “Women’s History Week.”  In 1987 after being petitioned by the National Women’s History Project, Congress passed Pub. L. 100-9 which designated the month of March 1987 as “Women’s History Month.”  Between 1988 and 1994, Congress passed additional resolutions requesting and authorizing the President to proclaim March of each year as Women’s History Month.  Since 1995, Presidents Clinton, Bush and Obama have issued a series of annual proclamations designating the month of March as “Women’s History Month.”

Bookmark and Share

March 10 at 5pm – Fairfield Firsts: 40 Years of Women Making History at Fairfield University

20070906_FU_logo_186_k_vert_03Fairfield Firsts: 40 Years of Women Making History at Fairfield University

Mon. March 10, 5-6:30pm

Kelley Center, Presentation Room – Light Refreshments will be served.

What was it like to be part of the first wave of women students at an all-male school? How were women treated when they joined the university as faculty members in the 1970s? How have things changed for women in leadership positions and in the other roles that were once reserved for men? Come join the discussion and add your questions, as we talk with “Fairfield Firsts” and celebrate Women’s History Month.

Panelists include: Dr. Dorothea Braginsky, Dr. Phyllis Braun, Janet Canepa, Dr. Robbin Crabtree, Dr. Doris Lippman

Moderator: Dr. Anna Lawrence

Sponsored by the Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies Program

 

Bookmark and Share